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16-10-2009

Iraq Inquiry asks the public to provide information

The Inquiry is no longer taking submissions and the online form was removed from the website in October 2012. 


Anyone with information which might support the Iraq Inquiry's work should get in touch as soon as possible, says Inquiry chairman Sir John Chilcot.

Sir John made his request ahead of the much-anticipated public evidence sessions, the first round of which are due to start in late autumn. He and the rest of the Inquiry Committee would like to hear from any individual or group with information which they feel could help the Inquiry fulfil its terms of reference and identify lessons to be learned for the future. People can either write to the Iraq Inquiry or submit information via a special form on the Inquiry website.

“It's very important to the Committee that we receive information from as wide a variety of sources as possible,”

said Sir John.

“We want to be certain that we have considered every angle of the UK's involvement in Iraq. Since starting our work at the end of July we have examined a huge amount of material already, but we want to ensure that we have access to all relevant material.”

The Iraq Inquiry committee members have already embarked on a series of meetings with UK families who lost close relations during the Iraq conflict in order to find out their views. They have also contacted organisations representing former and current military personnel, issuing an open invitation to people who served in Iraq during the conflict to take part in separate discussions.

“Sometimes what people will have to offer is an opinion, or a document, or an insight about some aspect of the Iraq conflict,”

said Sir John.

“It is all potentially valid in terms of our investigation. There may be someone out there with a crucial bit of information which could show an issue in a different light. It would be a great shame if that opportunity was missed.”

The Inquiry is asking for information which is relevant to its terms of reference. The Inquiry will consider the period from 2001 to the end of July 2009, embracing the run-up to the conflict in Iraq, the military action and its aftermath. The Inquiry intends to provide a reliable account of events that will help identify lessons for government to guide future foreign policy decision-making and decisions regarding conflict and post-conflict situations.

The address for written submissions is;

Submissions
The Iraq Inquiry
35 Great Smith Street
London SW1P 3BQ

An online submissions form is also available.